Another Thing Lost

Taco Bell is an American institution. Its Cheesy Fiesta Potatoes, Mexican Pizzas, Bean Burritos, Chalupas, Baja Blasts, and other venerable items have long powered the American landscape and my own life. However, recently the Bell has decided to betray the American people by removing some of these treasured foods from its expansive menu. Specifically, over the course of the last two months, TB has eliminated from its offerings the Mexican Pizza, Cheesy Fiesta Potatoes, Shredded Chicken Soft Taco, Shredded Chicken Burrito, Shredded Chicken Quesadilla Melt, Pico de Gallo, Grilled Steak Soft Taco, 7-Layer Burrito, Quesarito, Nachos Supreme, Beefy Fritos Burrito, Spicy Tostada, Triple Layer Nachos, Spicy Potato Soft Taco, Loaded Grillers (both cheesy potato and beefy nacho), Mini Skillet Bowl and Chips and Dips. This is a travesty. This is an American horror story. This is one of the worst things to happen in 2020.

Welcome to the Madhouse

We here at the paper have long been obsessed and confused with my co-editor Christian Decker’s love of metal music. He’s an ardent Catholic, THE definition of a softboy, and yet is the biggest fan of metal music I’ve ever met. So when Christian launched his own podcast over the summer, entitled “The Double Decker Metal Mayhem Horror Show” and found on Spotify and Anchor, there was no question whatsoever that I would listen to it, both to better understand my friend and a genre of music that is oft misunderstood.

Coronavirus Worries Lead to Anxiety Among Student Body

As the coronavirus has spread around the globe into a major pandemic, so too has a global panic surrounding the potential ramifications of the virus, from personal implications to the deleterious effects it could have on the economy. Goldman Sachs has projected zero growth for the American economy in the second quarter and, until recently, Chinese manufacturing was at a near-standstill. Economic effects are being felt especially hard in the manufacturing, travel, and services sectors.

Belmont is Gentrifying … Fast

The Fordham and Belmont communities have had a long, tenuous relationship with each other, to say the least. As we know, Fordham University has a student body that is predominantly both white and from upper-class backgrounds. In contrast, Belmont is incredibly ethnically diverse and one of the poorest in New York City. Specifically, 31% of Belmont residents fall below the poverty line. This compares to a Bronx average of 25% and a New York City average of 20%. Additionally, the average income in Bronx Community Board 6, which Belmont is located in, is a measly $25,972. To put that number in perspective, the average income in Bergen County, New Jersey, where many Fordham students originally hail from, is about $85,000. The unemployment rate in Belmont is much higher than the national average. As of the last count, it was about 16%. This is more than 5 times the national average!

Fordham Wins Tinder Contest

       As many of you may know, Fordham University just won TinderU’s #SwipeOff contest. This contest, in many ways inspired by the March Madness tournament, pits universities across the country against each other to see which one has the highest ratio of “swipe rights”. The winner of the competition gets a free concert, with the performer(s) this year being popular rapper Juice WRLD and British artist Charli XCX.

Is A Recession Coming?

Come this July the current economic expansion will be the longest recorded in modern American economic history. Our current expansionary period began in the aftermath of the 2007 – 2009 Great Recession and although it’s been slow growth economic growth wise in relation to  previous expansions, it has still delivered mild gains for the American Middle and Working classes; but with most gains going to the wealthiest Americans.