The Future of Tigers and Rhinos

The Chinese government has reversed a 25-year ban that will now allow for the use of tiger and rhino parts in medicine. The ban was established in 1993 as a way to protect the endangered tiger and rhino populations. In 2010, the World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies outlawed the use of any parts from endangered species claiming that there was no evidence of medical gains from tiger bones or rhino horns. With only 30,000 rhinos and 3,900 tigers left in the wild, experts are worried that the demands for these animals will rise; this will make it harder to protect these animals from extinction.
The Chinese government claims that the use of the tigers and rhinos will solely be used for medical purposes by qualified doctors. The usage of these parts are restricted to those individuals who are in critical condition and may not have any other medical alternatives.

Reviving the Dead: Why Everyone Should Study Latin

“You’re wasting your time.” These are the words I hear from my roommate every Monday and Thursday as I get ready to go to my Latin class. And every time she says these words I scream, “NO, I’M NOT.” While part of the reason I scream at her is that I am being defensive, the other reason for my screaming is simply because I believe that learning a dead language is useful. Yes, you read that right. Learning Latin is useful. Before all the modern language majors and minors storm at me in rage, let me explain to you why I think everyone should study Latin.