USG Attempts to Make the Best Out of Bad Situation

Well ladies and gentlemen, and those who do not identify with either gender, we’ve reached the apex of hell. The rest of the semester will be conducted from the privacy and loneliness of our respective homes. I’m not happy about it, you’re probably not happy about it, but nonetheless this is the situation we’ve found ourselves in. My heart truly goes out to the seniors, both those in high school and those at Fordham who are really getting screwed over by this. We love and appreciate you, and we wish you the best. That being said, we’ve got to get to the meat of the issue.

Jazz in the Caf

What’s more beautiful than sharing food? Sharing music—and, you ask, what happens when you share both? Love, which is exactly what Fordham University provided its students on February 5th, 2020, yet another year of our Lord. Preparing for a quick lunch date, we were walking to the Mecca of Fordham University, the cafeteria, excited by the thought of consuming its nutritional product, and not expecting anything out of the ordinary. What we found, however, was extraordinary—the real fountain of youth—a small band of six middle-aged men playing jazz. Notably, the drummer of the band resembled an older version of one of our very own Editor-In-Chiefs, Christian Decker. All the more delightful!

Bring Back the Rameses Dynasty

On the hallowed grounds of Rose Hill, the legacy of Fordham’s athletic achievements shine bright. The 7 Pillars of Granite, the bell, the Lombardi name, and other mementos to Fordham’s athletic prowess are held high. Yet today, Fordham is seeing a crisis in school spirit. Attend any football or basketball game and the crowds are lively, but too often there is a teetering feeling that all depends on how good the team is playing. The bleachers are almost never filled, and even though we love our school, we can’t all profess to love our sports teams.

Belmont is Gentrifying … Fast

The Fordham and Belmont communities have had a long, tenuous relationship with each other, to say the least. As we know, Fordham University has a student body that is predominantly both white and from upper-class backgrounds. In contrast, Belmont is incredibly ethnically diverse and one of the poorest in New York City. Specifically, 31% of Belmont residents fall below the poverty line. This compares to a Bronx average of 25% and a New York City average of 20%. Additionally, the average income in Bronx Community Board 6, which Belmont is located in, is a measly $25,972. To put that number in perspective, the average income in Bergen County, New Jersey, where many Fordham students originally hail from, is about $85,000. The unemployment rate in Belmont is much higher than the national average. As of the last count, it was about 16%. This is more than 5 times the national average!

McGinley Center About to Get a Lot More Awesome

Nothing elicits a “bruh” more than running into construction on one’s daily commute. Since the beginning of the school year, a flurry of heavy machinery, fluorescent vests, and fences have been all around Fordham University’s Rose Hill campus. Truly, chaos reigns supreme when it comes to McGinley center, Collins Hall, and Walsh Library, where construction workers mill about, the road can be blocked off, and all assortments of jackhammers and clanging can be heard.