Fordham Joins National Walkout against Gun Violence

It was a chilly, but cloudless day, on March 14th, when members of the Fordham community––following in the footsteps of over 30,000 other students across the nation––gathered on Edward’s Parade to commemorate the one-month anniversary of the shooting that took place on Valentine’s Day at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. As the Keating bells struck 10, crowds of students and staff members filed out of classroom buildings and clustered by the fence facing the Lombardi Center to stand in solidarity with the victims of the shooting, as well as the students actively fighting for urgently-needed gun reform laws.

Never Again: Activism in the Wake of the Parkland Shooting

In the wake of the horrific mass shooting at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, in which seventeen people were killed, there has been a sustained and significant activist movement for gun control and a substantial shift in public opinion on the issue. This has given many hope that this horrible incident could potentially lead to change, even after the continued inaction that has fol-lowed previous mass shootings, such in Sandy Hook, Orlando, and Las Vegas, among countless others.

Fordham Issues Statement on Student Protests

What do you define as free speech? In our age of hyper-politicization, the definition of free speech has become gray with well-founded opinions and hate-speech intersecting on social media. Fordham University and free speech have had, well to put it lightly, a complicated relationship. While Fordham claims to be champions of peaceful and respectful student demonstrations it has also shown on multiple occasions to be rather controlling of student speech and protest. The latest chapter in this story occurred last week when the Office of the President released a statement regarding demonstrations against gun violence.

Legendary Love: An Interview with Walter Naegle

Walter Naegle, a Fordham alumnus, was the long-term partner of Bayard Rustin, the civil rights leader who served as chief strategist of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, and mentored Dr. King in practical non-violence. In this interview, Mr. Naegle reflects on his life in NYC, the progress of LGBT rights at Fordham, and Rustin’s lasting legacy.

Dispatches From the French Homefront: Quick Observations

Smoking: It is true! People in France smoke! Like a lot! This isn’t really news! MTV worked really hard to educate children in the U.S. about the dangers of smoking, but their efforts were not received well in France because these cancer sticks are clearly still as prominent as ever! It’s silly how a country filled with such tasty food is willing to destroy their taste buds (AND LUNGS) for a quick drag.